2008 November - emission impossible - agriculture’s role in emissions trading

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Farm Policy Journal - Vol 5 No 4 2008 November - Full Journal

Emission impossible? agriculture’s role in emissions trading
November Quarter 2008, Volume 5, Number 4
Publisher - Australian Farm Institute

$60.50


 
 




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Farm Policy Journal - Vol 1 No 3 2004 November - Full Journal

Climate Change - Can Agriculture Take the Heat?
November Quarter 2004, Volume 1, Number 3
Publisher - Australian Farm Institute

$60.50


Some Impacts on Agriculture of an Australian Emissions Trading Scheme

The Australian Government proposes to introduce a national greenhouse emissions trading scheme which will commence in July 2010. In its initial stages, the scheme will require firms that directly emit more than 25,000 tonnes of carbon dioxide equivalent per annum to be participants, and to purchase government-issued emission permits equivalent to their estimated annual greenhouse emissions.

Transport fuel distributors will also be required to be participants, and will be responsible for the emissions estimated to be created when the fuel they sell is combusted.

Farm businesses will not be required to directly participate in the scheme in its initial years. The government has announced that the earliest that farm businesses might be required to participate in the scheme will be 2015, with a final decision to be made in 2013. The announcement of this timetable for decisions concerning farm business participation might lead to a sense of complacency about both the potential impact of the scheme on farm businesses, and the need for decisions about future farm participation. On both counts, it seems the complacency may be mis-founded.

Firstly, the fact that farm businesses are price takers in global markets and consumers of a wide range of inputs – many of which are energy or energy-related – means that the indirect impact of energy-price increases will directly impact on farm profitability, irrespective of farm-sector participation. Secondly, if farm businesses are to become scheme participants, administrative decisions will need to be made well in advance of 2013 in order for this to occur.

For these reasons, the research reported here provides critical and timely information that will assist the farm sector and policy-makers in future decision-making processes relating to this most challenging issue.

The research was commissioned before the Australian Government released its White Paper, specifying the preferred design of the national emissions trading scheme, and it therefore does not precisely model the potential impacts of those proposals on the farm sector. However, the scenarios modelled in this research are sufficiently close to the White Paper proposals such that the results of the analysis reported here are very relevant to considerations about future potential impacts of the scheme on farm businesses.

It is hoped this research will assist both the farm sector and policy-makers in reaching robust and appropriate decisions about the future role of the farm sector in the national emissions trading scheme. The changes likely to arise from these decisions will be profound and long-lasting, and for that reason require very careful consideration and analysis.

This report provides the Australian agricultural sector and its associated commodity and regional sub-sectors with a strong understanding of the economic implications of a range of different greenhouse policy scenarios. Prepared for the Australian Farm Institute, Australian Wool Innovation, Dairy Australia and Cotton R&D Corporation by the Centre for International Economics, the research report adds valuable information to the debate on greenhouse gas emission policies. 

Full Report
February 2009, pp. 1 - 68 (68 pages)
Publisher: Australian Farm Institue
Author: TheCIE
ISBN:978-0-9805475-8-0

$77.00


FPJ0604 Article - Agriculture, Carbon Trading and Border Tax Adjustments Under International Trade Rules

Epps, T
Farm Policy Journal, November 2009, Volume 6, Number 4,  pp. 31 - 41 (11 pages)
ecomarketing-ecolabelling-carbon labelling -BTA-climate change

$12.10


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