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Food, climate and emissions - a complex tangle

- Thursday, October 01, 2009

In an interesting coincidence that highlights the complexities of major policy issues confronting agriculture, the FAO and IFPRI have both recently issued major reports highlighting the challenge that the world will face in producing enough food in the future. The FAO analysis indicates a need to produce 70% more food by 2050, while the IFPRI analysis projects that the impact of a changing climate will reduce global agricultural output, with child malnutrition projected to increase by 20%. This leads to some interesting challenges when it comes to designing policies to mitigate greenhouse emissions attributed to agriculture. View the rest of the post here

 
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US climate legislation to be introduced in the Senate

- Monday, September 28, 2009

The US Senate Democrats are expected to introduce their version of US climate change legislation on Wednesday 30th September, and this will signal the start of the next stage of legislative wrangling on this issue. View the rest of the post here

 
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New Zealanders don't support Ag inclusion in ETS

- Thursday, September 24, 2009

A survey of 1,000 New Zealanders has revealed that most people do not support the inclusion of livestock emissions in the New Zealand emissions trading scheme. The survey also revealed that a large proportion of respondents are uncertain about whether or not livestock emissions should be included in an ETS. View the rest of the post here

 
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French opt for a carbon tax from 2010

- Monday, September 21, 2009

The French President, Nicolas Sarkozy, has announced that the French Government will impose a carbon tax from January 1st, 2010, with the rate initially set at 17 euros ( $A 28.80) per tonne of emissions. While the measure has still to be approved by the French Parliament, Sarkozy's large majority make passage of the measure fairly certain. View the rest of the post here

 
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Farmers need incentives to reduce emissions - EU

- Friday, September 18, 2009

The EU Agricultural Commissioner Mariann Fischer Boel has highlighted the challenge associated with trying to reduce farm emissions will still feeding the world in a speech to EU Agriculture Ministers in Sweden. Her key message was that the farm sector will need to be provided with significant incentives, as well as sustained research and development investment in order to cope with the challenge presented by farm-sector emission mitigation. View the rest of the post here

 
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NZ announces revised ETS

- Tuesday, September 15, 2009

The New Zealand Government has announced a revised design for its Emissions Trading Scheme, with agriculture to be included in the scheme from 2015. View the rest of the post here

 
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US agricultural offsets come under scrutiny.

- Monday, September 14, 2009

The Chicago Climate Exchange (CCX) is reported to have employed a high profile Washington lobbying firm to help campaign for the recognition of agricultural offsets under the proposed US climate change legislation, as the validity and robustness of some agricultural offsets are coming under question. View the rest of the post here

 
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NSW, Vic Governments release agriculture and the CPRS report

- Friday, September 11, 2009

The NSW and Victorian Governments have released the report of some research conducted by Acil-Tasman, which has examined the role of agriculture in the Australian Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme. View the rest of the post here

 
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Major parties begin ETS negotiations in NZ

- Thursday, September 10, 2009

Media reports state that the New Zealand Government and the main opposition party New Zealand Labour have begun negotiations to try and reach agreement of the details of a future New Zealand emissions trading scheme. View the rest of the post here

 
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Impact of US ETS on farm mixed, with croppers better off

- Tuesday, September 08, 2009

Texas A&M University has released the results of a detailed study of the projected impacts of the proposed US ETS on a sample of US farms. The results indicate that crop farmers will generally be better off (because they will be able to adopt no-till and sell the resulting carbon offsets) while livestock farmers will be worse off. View the rest of the post here

 
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